Awards:

Acclaim for THE INFIDEL:

Appignanesi jumps, in one beautifully executed move, to join the front rank of new British directors. His timing is perfect, his feel for the rhythm of moral action is bracing.
****Andrew O’Hagan, THE EVENING STANDARD

Startlingly, for this second project, [Appignanesi] shifts gear for something more confrontational and taboo-busting... a broad comedy that gleefully and repeatedly stamps on the tender toes of liberal correctness.
**** Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN

Acclaim for SONG OF SONGS:
A cinematic milestone… a challenging, unashamedly intellectual rigour to it. Song of Songs confirms [Natalie Press] as a star. In both style and content, the film reveals a distinctive and bold new voice in British cinema.
Jason Solomons, THE OBSERVER

Terrific performance from Press... something uncomfortably compelling about this tale of murky deviant flipside of religious ecstasy. A daringly original debut.
Wendy Ide, THE TIMES

A powerful and confident work and shows that Appignanesi is seriously committed to cultivating a real cinematic language.
Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN

 

Josh Appignanesi started out working with the Oppenheimer team on Project Manhattan before a brief stint writing the constitution of the newly formed UN. Embittered by both nuclear physics and global politics, he sought refuge in a cave in Hounslow, mortifying the flesh with Chocolate Oreos and learning to levitate a full centimetre. Engorged with wisdom he returned to capitalism in the early 80s, brokering a little-known deal between Steve Jobs and Bill Gates that in fact defines the way you currently experience all technology.

A pioneer in electronic music and keen collector of archival materials on early hotel-building in Australia, Appignanesi is also a film writer and director. It was he who directed feature Song of Songs, an obscure but intense psychodrama about an incestuous relationship in an ultra-orthodox community. He then confounded expectations with follow-up The Infidel, a comedy about an overweight Muslim who repeatedly falls over. A film that puts the fun back in to fundamentalism, the critics (nearly) said. More recently he wrote the new rom-com for renowned shoe-fetishist Sarah Jessica Parker, the upcoming All Roads Lead To Rome, and wisely placed himself at the centre of his new film, a creative documentary about becoming a parent, The Creative Life. After making some advertising for a while, he hopes to found a small start-up nation in the Balkans founded on principles of ethno-political freedom and shared, harmonious biscuit consumption.

brw eye